About

PressED is a twitter conference (#pressedconf18) looking into how WordPress is used in teaching, pedagogy and research.

Anyone using WordPress for teaching, learning or research at a University, School or College can submit a proposal. We’d love to hear from you. It doesn’t need to be ground breaking or innovative, any idea is more than welcome 🙂

The deadline for submissions is the 23rd of February (Midnight GMT)

We’re very much inspired by the Public Archaeology Twitter Conference

When

March 29th from 10am (BST / GMT+1)  to 10pm  (BST / GMT+1)  onwards

Take part

The conference is made up of sessions.

Each session at the conference is based on 10-15 tweets in a fifteen minute period. If you’re presenting (submit here!) you can add videos, gifs, slides, links or whatever you’d like to your tweets

You can also take part by following the hashtag (#pressedconf18) for the day – or at any time after the conference has happened.

When a session finishes, there’ll be a chance to ask questions.

If you’ve not got time to do a session, feel free to send us a link to your WordPress Projects and we’ll add them to our resource bank.

Deadline

Hey – don’t stress – but please submit by Midnight on February the 23rd

Submit

Fancy submitting an abstract, just fill out this form

The deadline for submissions is the 23rd of February (Midnight GMT)

Joint submissions are welcome

If you get into any issues, please just email hey@pressedconf.org 🙂 or tweet us @pressedconf

Conduct

Here is the complete conference code of conduct

Our open PressED community strives to

  • Be friendly and patient.
  • Be welcoming: We strive to be a community that welcomes and supports people of all backgrounds and identities. This includes, but is not limited to members of any race, ethnicity, culture, national origin, colour, immigration status, social and economic class, educational level, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, age, size, family status, political belief, religion, and mental and physical ability.
  • Be considerate: Remember that we’re a world-wide community, so you might not be communicating in someone else’s primary language.
  • Be respectful: Not all of us will agree all the time, but disagreement is no excuse for poor behavior and poor manners. We might all experience some frustration now and then, but we cannot allow that frustration to turn into a personal attack. It’s important to remember that a community where people feel uncomfortable or threatened is not a productive one.
  • Be careful in the words that you choose: we are a community of professionals, and we conduct ourselves professionally. Be kind to others. Do not insult or put down other participants. Harassment and other exclusionary behavior aren’t acceptable. This includes, but is not limited to:
    • Violent threats or language directed against another person.
    • Discriminatory jokes and language.
    • Posting sexually explicit or violent material.
    • Posting (or threatening to post) other people’s personally identifying information (“doxing”).
    • Personal insults, especially those using racist or sexist terms.
    • Unwelcome sexual attention.
    • Advocating for, or encouraging, any of the above behavior.
    • Repeated harassment of others. In general, if someone asks you to stop, then stop.
  • When we disagree, try to understand why: Disagreements, both social, academic and technical, happen all the time. It is important that we resolve disagreements and differing views constructively. Remember that we’re different. The strength of our community comes from its diversity, people from a wide range of backgrounds. Different people have different perspectives on issues. Being unable to understand why someone holds a viewpoint doesn’t mean that they’re wrong. Don’t forget that it is human to err and blaming each other doesn’t get us anywhere. Instead, focus on helping to resolve issues and learning from mistakes.

 

Organisers

Natalie Lafferty (@nlafferty)

Natalie is an open education practitioner in higher and medical education and heads the Centre for Technology and Innovation in Learning at the University of Dundee. Over the past 10 years she’s been an advocate of using open technologies in higher education to support co-creation of learning and digital scholarship.  Natalie led the development of Dundee Medical School’s WordPress-based VLE “MedBlogs’ and in her teaching encourages students to use WordPress to support their reflective practice.

and


Pat Lockley (@pgogy)

Pat Lockley (@pgogy) started out in WordPress at the University of Nottingham as a blogger.

He then went to work at the University of Oxford on a WordPress OER project as a developer. When that ended, he worked on another WordPress OER project

He then went to the University of London, where amongst other things, he helped redesign their blog

For the last four years, he’s been self-employed running Pgogy Webstuff and doing a lot in WordPress

You can see more on his WordPress dot Org profile

Legal stuff

We’re not linked with WordPress in any legal way (bar being users) and we’re not an official WordCamp.

We’re also not linked with WP Campus.

All of the above are great things however and you should check them out!

Credits